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Career needs repetition? Here are 5 tips on how to turn your life experience into your full-time career

by Holly Caplan, author of “Surviving the Dick Clique: A Girls’ Guide to Surviving the Male-Dominated Corporate World”

If you have been wondering whether your current career is truly fulfilling you, you are not alone. Many of us review the past 25 years of our working lives and consider how to approach the next. The pandemic has certainly propelled this process forward, seriously questioning the future of several industries and the careers associated with them. Our second act, however, is right ahead of us, and in these moments of uncertainty is our chance for a career reinvention. We can look at all of those years of experience in the rearview mirror and turn it into a full-time career. It can be the answer to happiness, fulfillment, and security.

Here are five tips for re-evaluating and transforming your life experiences into a full-time career.

1. List your skills and achievements.

Know that your skills and talents make you different and special. As you think about your reinvention, write down all of these personal and professional skills and back them up with your accomplishments and awards. Seeing these on paper will remind you of your years of accolades and point out your strengths that are in line with self-bonded careers.

2. Brainstorm your company.

Make a list of all the things you’ve ever wanted to do. Don’t worry about how silly some may seem, just know that brainstorming and free thinking bring new ideas. Then take the time to slowly review your list to see what is realistic, fulfilling, and sustainable for your personal needs. This list can change over time. The most important part of this is getting started.

3. Find a mentor.

If you are reinventing your career outside of the previous battle, you need to find someone to look for encouragement and guidance from. Identify someone who has already been reinvented and is ready to offer you inspiration, honesty, and unconditional support.

4. 30 minutes a day.

Work on your new reinvention project for at least 30 minutes a day. Many of those who are in this process are still active in other areas of responsibility and cannot yet make full efforts. Use this time to secure your new website address, plan networking meetings or do market research for your new company. If you give yourself permission to take these 30 minutes, you can keep the momentum going and build your confidence day in and day out that you are working toward what you really want in life.

5. Be patient with yourself.

We all want answers and overnight success. We can also tend to be tough on ourselves if we don’t immediately know what to do or how to achieve it. Be patient with yourself. Now that you are self-employed, you can do so at your own pace and on your own terms.

Take the time to reinvent yourself. Your professional experience and personal progress bring you to this moment to do what you really want in your second act.

Holly Caplan is a career coach, workplace expert, and author of Surviving the Dick Clique: A Girls’ Guide to Surviving the Male-Dominated Corporate World. Caplan has been selling medical products for twenty years. She was a sales representative, sales trainer and then fought her way into management. Caplan has been featured in top media outlets such as Entrepreneur, Cosmo, Cheddar and many more.

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